Shelves – Disc Shelf http://disc-shelf.com/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 07:26:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://disc-shelf.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Shelves – Disc Shelf http://disc-shelf.com/ 32 32 Tesco faces empty shelves this Christmas as angry Doncaster workers reject pay offer https://disc-shelf.com/tesco-faces-empty-shelves-this-christmas-as-angry-doncaster-workers-reject-pay-offer/ https://disc-shelf.com/tesco-faces-empty-shelves-this-christmas-as-angry-doncaster-workers-reject-pay-offer/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 07:02:00 +0000 https://disc-shelf.com/tesco-faces-empty-shelves-this-christmas-as-angry-doncaster-workers-reject-pay-offer/ Truck drivers and warehouse workers at four of the supermarket’s distribution centers, including the Doncaster depot at Middle Bank, have rejected an offer of below-inflation pay, union officials said. If members vote to strike, Tesco’s shelves will quickly become empty this winter, potentially affecting the Christmas season, warned Unite, the UK’s largest union. Following a […]]]>

Truck drivers and warehouse workers at four of the supermarket’s distribution centers, including the Doncaster depot at Middle Bank, have rejected an offer of below-inflation pay, union officials said.

If members vote to strike, Tesco’s shelves will quickly become empty this winter, potentially affecting the Christmas season, warned Unite, the UK’s largest union.

Following a consultative vote, workers overwhelmingly rejected Tesco’s “full and final pay offer” of a 2.5 percent pay rise. Unite said the deal was a substantial reduction in wages in real terms, with RPI’s inflation rate currently at 4.8%.

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Tesco workers in Doncaster have rejected a wage deal.

Unite General Secretary Sharon Graham said: “Tesco staff have continued to work throughout the pandemic and that alone surely means they deserve a decent pay rise. Instead, they are offered what is, in effect, a pay cut.

“Tesco shareholders will be well rewarded with Tesco’s £ 3 billion profit. Unite is now preparing for industrial action to ensure workers get their share as well. “

The distribution centers that rejected the wage offer are Belfast, Didcot, Doncaster and Thurrock and more than 3,500 Tesco workers are part of the dispute.

Tesco’s latest accounts show it made a profit of £ 3.17 billion last year.

During negotiations, the union said Tesco made it clear that it did not believe it needed to raise truck drivers’ wages significantly. Despite high-profile driver shortages, the supermarket says it has a waiting list of 400 drivers eager to work for the company.

Unite’s national officer Adrian Jones said: “The arrogance and contempt for its workforce currently displayed by Tesco management is shocking; they forgot, don’t know or don’t care that the success of the company is due to the hard work and diligence of its employees.

“If a full industrial action resulting in empty shelves ensues, consumers should understand that this dispute is entirely on Tesco’s own initiative.”

The Doncaster depot has been at the center of several social disputes in recent years.


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Edinburgh Lidl shoppers spot empty shelves as essential supplies disappear https://disc-shelf.com/edinburgh-lidl-shoppers-spot-empty-shelves-as-essential-supplies-disappear/ https://disc-shelf.com/edinburgh-lidl-shoppers-spot-empty-shelves-as-essential-supplies-disappear/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 16:15:10 +0000 https://disc-shelf.com/edinburgh-lidl-shoppers-spot-empty-shelves-as-essential-supplies-disappear/ Intrusive lockdown reminders were spotted at Lidl stores in Edinburgh this week after aisles were stripped of all toilet paper. Shoppers visiting for essential supplies were surprised to see that a number of food and household items were missing from various supermarkets in the city. With supply issues affecting many retailers both in and out […]]]>

Intrusive lockdown reminders were spotted at Lidl stores in Edinburgh this week after aisles were stripped of all toilet paper.

Shoppers visiting for essential supplies were surprised to see that a number of food and household items were missing from various supermarkets in the city.

With supply issues affecting many retailers both in and out of Edinburgh, a buyer at the Newington store had shared a picture of the completely bare toilet paper aisle.

Most of the store had only empty shelves, leaving no rolls in reserve.

Similar scenes were seen in the Easter Road branch at Lidl on Friday, September 17, with a serious lack of fresh fruit and vegetables available.

Shocked at the huge gaps in the aisles, another customer had shared a series of photos online showing empty pallets and boxes of produce around the store.



The stock was almost empty

General fruits and vegetables and those kept in the refrigerator appeared to have been looted by customers, with a refrigerator containing only a few isolated packages of blueberries.

A center aisle shelf was also seen almost cleaned up, with just a few crates dotted with produce.

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It comes as retailers across the UK face food and drink shortages on the shelves, with an industry leader warning the situation could become permanent.



corridor
The shelves had almost been cleaned

Food and Drink Federation chief executive Ian Wright has warned that the supply problems that have already plagued supermarkets as well as take-out and restaurants “will worsen” as the market changes. permanent after Brexit and the pandemic.

According to Yorkshire LiveMr. Wright also stressed that “these shortages do not mean that you are going to run out of food.”

He added: “The UK shopper might previously have expected just about any product they want to be on the shelves or in restaurants all the time.

“It’s over and I don’t think it’s coming back.”

A spokesperson for Lidl said: “Unfortunately, like a number of other retailers, there have been disruptions in our supply chain networks affecting a limited number of product lines.

“We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause and are doing everything possible to resolve any issues as soon as possible and minimize any impact on our customers.”


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Paint shortage 2021: Workers explain why store owners struggle to keep product on shelves https://disc-shelf.com/paint-shortage-2021-workers-explain-why-store-owners-struggle-to-keep-product-on-shelves/ https://disc-shelf.com/paint-shortage-2021-workers-explain-why-store-owners-struggle-to-keep-product-on-shelves/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 00:09:07 +0000 https://disc-shelf.com/paint-shortage-2021-workers-explain-why-store-owners-struggle-to-keep-product-on-shelves/ Albany, CA (KGO) -With an ongoing pandemic-related shortage, it’s hard to find paint. Yes, paint cans are in high demand and scarce, resulting in high prices. Paints are scarce and expensive for the foreseeable future. According to contractors and painters, store owners find it difficult to keep items on the shelves. Related: Ford closes several […]]]>
Albany, CA (KGO) -With an ongoing pandemic-related shortage, it’s hard to find paint. Yes, paint cans are in high demand and scarce, resulting in high prices.

Paints are scarce and expensive for the foreseeable future.

According to contractors and painters, store owners find it difficult to keep items on the shelves.

Related: Ford closes several factories due to lack of computer chips to keep car prices soaring like GM

“Prices are going up, prices are changing and materials are not available,” says Bob Langbine, owner of the East Bay Paint Center in Albany.

He says every day he only gets one gallon out of the three gallons he orders because he’s shocked the customer has to postpone the project.

The price has exceeded 10%.

“It’s kind of a perfect storm,” Langbine said. “We couldn’t get it because of a shortage of canisters around the world. There are a lot of plastic cans in the store. The great frost in Texas caused so much damage to raw materials and plants that it literally produced. He stopped. “

video: COVID-19 Rapid increase in sales of household appliances that creates shortage during pandemic

Added to this is a shortage of truck drivers and back up containers piled up in the port. Painting tools such as sanders are out of stock for up to 8 months.

“In reality, we are short of key materials for plywood, dimensional materials and paints,” said Ron Paz, owner of Paz Construction and Management Services.

He explained that the biggest challenge other than cost is time. Can they even get materials, or things like windows and doors?

“It used to be 4-6 weeks, but now we’re talking 8-10 weeks,” Paz says.

Related: Chicken shortages looming due to increased demand and supply chain disruptions

In addition to shortages and delays in delivery, more and more people are carrying out home improvement projects. Some paint stores are forecasting this year’s activity to increase by 20%.

Experts suggest that if you have a painting project, you are flexible with the materials you plan to use. And order the painting at least 3 weeks in advance.

Copyright © 2021 KGO-TV. All rights reserved.

2021 paint shortage: Workers explain why store owners struggle to keep product on shelves Source link 2021 paint shortage: Workers explain why store owners struggle to keep product on shelves


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Supply chain crisis: John Lewis charters ships to fill shelves before Christmas https://disc-shelf.com/supply-chain-crisis-john-lewis-charters-ships-to-fill-shelves-before-christmas/ https://disc-shelf.com/supply-chain-crisis-john-lewis-charters-ships-to-fill-shelves-before-christmas/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 17:05:11 +0000 https://disc-shelf.com/supply-chain-crisis-john-lewis-charters-ships-to-fill-shelves-before-christmas/ John Lewis has chartered vessels to ensure they have stocks on hand for Christmas as supply chain shortages continue. Several retailers and restaurants across the country are grappling with supply chain issues due to Brexit, the shortage of heavy truck drivers and the effect of the pandemic. John Lewis President Sharon White said the company […]]]>

John Lewis has chartered vessels to ensure they have stocks on hand for Christmas as supply chain shortages continue.

Several retailers and restaurants across the country are grappling with supply chain issues due to Brexit, the shortage of heavy truck drivers and the effect of the pandemic.

John Lewis President Sharon White said the company is positioning itself to ensure that the stockouts encountered this summer do not disrupt Christmas.

The partnership has lined up additional ships through a freight company it works with to increase import options, she said.

Earlier this week, the retailer announced plans to hire more than 7,000 temporary workers across the country – 2,000 more than last year – to ensure inventory availability during the holiday season.

The chain recorded a pre-tax loss of £ 29million for the six months ending July 31, with a loss of £ 635million in the same period last year when the first nationwide lockdown took place.

John Lewis has also raised the wages of heavy-duty delivery drivers to address labor shortages, an adjustment, said Ms White, which is already showing results.

“We are working very quickly to make sure Christmas is going well,” added Ms. White. “We want to act now before anything becomes a major problem. We have worked in advance with shipments, such as Christmas trees and other goods, from Asia to avoid disruption. “

However, John Lewis’s famous Christmas TV commercial is reportedly delayed for two weeks.


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Shelves laid bare at Co-op in Dalton amid ‘disruption’ in supplies https://disc-shelf.com/shelves-laid-bare-at-co-op-in-dalton-amid-disruption-in-supplies/ https://disc-shelf.com/shelves-laid-bare-at-co-op-in-dalton-amid-disruption-in-supplies/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://disc-shelf.com/shelves-laid-bare-at-co-op-in-dalton-amid-disruption-in-supplies/ SHELVES laid bare in a city supermarket which is grappling with a “disruption” of deliveries and stocks. Customers visiting the Market Street, Dalton Co-op this week were shocked to find the shelves were completely empty in the city’s only supermarket. The refrigerated aisle with ready meals and pizza was empty on Monday, leading shoppers to […]]]>

SHELVES laid bare in a city supermarket which is grappling with a “disruption” of deliveries and stocks.

Customers visiting the Market Street, Dalton Co-op this week were shocked to find the shelves were completely empty in the city’s only supermarket.

The refrigerated aisle with ready meals and pizza was empty on Monday, leading shoppers to visit other retailers for their everyday items.

However, Co-op is not the only one with inventory supply issues. More than a quarter of catering and hospitality businesses have been hit by low inventory levels in recent weeks as Britain’s growing supply chain crisis takes its toll, new figures from the l ‘Office for National Statistics (ONS).

A recent business survey found that 27% of food and beverage companies reported lower than normal inventory levels – the hardest hit of any industry.

It comes amid a growing supply chain crisis, which is increasingly leaving supermarket shelves empty and leading to a shortage of materials and higher prices in many industries, from housing construction to construction. automobile production.

Fast food chain McDonald’s had to remove milkshakes and bottled drinks from its menu last month as it battled supply issues due to a shortage of truck drivers.

The latest bimonthly ONS survey found that businesses across the UK are struggling to source materials, goods and services.

A Co-op spokesperson said, “We’re sorry to run out of some products.

“Like many retailers, we are affected by uneven disruption to our deliveries and in-store operations.

“But we are working closely with our suppliers – and recruiting up to 3,000 temporary colleagues – to keep depots at full capacity and quickly restock stores.”

Images also shared last week by The Mail showed completely empty shelves at Tesco in Hindpool Road, Barrow.

The shelves usually used to display vegetables were bare amid national problems with food supply chains.


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Shortage of truckers causing empty shelves https://disc-shelf.com/shortage-of-truckers-causing-empty-shelves/ https://disc-shelf.com/shortage-of-truckers-causing-empty-shelves/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 04:30:00 +0000 https://disc-shelf.com/shortage-of-truckers-causing-empty-shelves/ Driver wanted, Norfolk. Salary range from £ 46,000 to £ 54,000. Includes uniform, £ 26 nightly allowance and £ 10 per day for meals. You would think people would line up to get into the cab of a heavy truck with those wages. But a driver shortage means supermarkets are struggling to stock their shelves, […]]]>

Driver wanted, Norfolk. Salary range from £ 46,000 to £ 54,000. Includes uniform, £ 26 nightly allowance and £ 10 per day for meals.

You would think people would line up to get into the cab of a heavy truck with those wages. But a driver shortage means supermarkets are struggling to stock their shelves, amid warnings things could get worse.

A double whammy of a backlog of heavy truck tests caused by Covid and foreign drivers returning home due to Brexit has exposed the Achilles heel of our economy.


DVSA fears shortages will become ‘acute’ as Christmas approaches
– Credit: Archant

But that’s not the only reason carriers like Fakenham-based Jack Richards and Son are struggling to recruit staff.

Things were very different when the late founder of the company, Jack, hit the road with his first truck in the 1950s, delivering fruit and vegetables from the Fens to wholesale markets in the East Midlands.


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His business grew in the 1960s and 1970s as the way we shop changed. Supermarkets have replaced greengrocers. Processed foods replaced fresh produce and the supply chain was born.

Instead of being placed almost directly on the market, the products were washed and graded before being sent to the packing station. Then it left for the warehouse before being delivered to the store.

Fakenham-based Jack’s yellow truck fleet has grown steadily to meet demand as our food miles skyrocketed.


Fakenham;  Jack Richards puts poppies on his entire fleet of trucks;  Jack is a leader inm e

The late Jack Richards, whose Fakenham-based haulage business started with one truck and is now an integral part of the supermarket supply chain.
– Credit: Colin Finch

Today, the company’s 350 trucks are part of a larger group with 2,500 trucks carrying names known like Kellogg’s Cornflakes, as well as the raw materials to make staple foods like baked beans.

Food travels across the country before ending up in our shopping carts. Road transport has become the heart of the economy.

But here is the catch. Because if there aren’t enough people to drive the trucks, the shelves will soon be empty.


Dominic Purslow, depot manager at Jack Richards & Son

Dominic Purslow, Managing Director of the Jack Richards and Son depot in Fakenham
– Credit: Archant

Jack Richards Managing Director Dominic Purslow said: “It’s all a supply chain issue.

“Say Tesco needs boxes of baked beans. Beans go by truck to the factory, sugar goes by truck to the factory, vinegar goes by truck to the factory.

“The steel has to go from Wales to Norwich to be made into boxes. The cardboard and ink should go to the people who print the labels, before going to the people who make the boxes.

“It’s a huge problem right now across the industry.”

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency estimates that we have about 76,000 less drivers than we need. He warns that the shortages are likely to become “acute” as Christmas approaches. Toys and turkeys might be missing, in other words.


Jack Richards & Sons items are loaded and ready for delivery to the Fakenham depot.  Photo: Matthe

A truck is loaded at the deportation of Jack Richards to Fakenham. Industry struggles to recruit enough drivers
– Credit: Matthew Usher

The DVSA simplifies the procedures for taking a HGV test with the aim of reducing the number of learners waiting to take it. But he warns that this requires a change in the law, which will take time.

Mr Purslow said even if carriers could train more drivers, they would not be able to screen them to certify their skills, leaving companies at the mercy of the DVSA backlog.

Industry executives say the shortage has been made worse by the fact that thousands of foreign drivers are returning home because of Brexit.

They are asking for the creation of temporary visas to allow them to return to our roads.

But Mr Purslow said there was another reason the £ 54,000 salaries were not filling the driving positions. Thousands of people who are allowed to drive trucks for a living are choosing other ways to make a living from long working hours, the stress of driving on our increasingly congested roads and poor conditions.

“Truck stops are no longer there,” Purslow said. “The highway services charge us huge sums for parking at night, but they have the worst facilities – dirty toilets, dirty showers. Drivers have to find a parking area with whatever it means for their personal hygiene. .

“Welcome to the world of trucking: here’s a nice new uniform, here’s a nice new truck – oh, and here’s a plastic bottle to use for the washroom. No wonder the drivers are turning their backs on the industry.”

* We are broadcasting a series of special mover reports over the coming days on the shortage crisis and the impact on the region and its people.


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60 products removed from shelves in widespread food recall https://disc-shelf.com/60-products-removed-from-shelves-in-widespread-food-recall/ https://disc-shelf.com/60-products-removed-from-shelves-in-widespread-food-recall/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 07:01:00 +0000 https://disc-shelf.com/60-products-removed-from-shelves-in-widespread-food-recall/ About 60 products have been recalled due to contamination with a carcinogen in one of the most widespread recalls to date, the Department of Health said on Tuesday. Ethylene oxide was first detected on sesame seeds in Belgium in 2020 – from India – and has since been found in a widely used thickening agent, […]]]>

About 60 products have been recalled due to contamination with a carcinogen in one of the most widespread recalls to date, the Department of Health said on Tuesday.

Ethylene oxide was first detected on sesame seeds in Belgium in 2020 – from India – and has since been found in a widely used thickening agent, locust bean gum and others. foodstuffs, leading to the removal of thousands of products from shelves across the EU.

In Malta, the products recalled so far are lots of popular brands of ice cream, such as Twix, Toblerone and Milka, alternative milks, crackers, cookies, cream, cream cheese and noodles. snapshots.

However, in other EU member states spices, vegetables, grains and oils are part of a range of other products that have also been affected.

“The ethylene oxide problem is certainly one of the most prevalent local recalls, as several products from various companies are involved,” said Ministry of Health spokeswoman Roberta Fenech.

While ethylene oxide is used to disinfect food in a number of countries outside the European Union area, it is not permitted in EU food production and residues in foods violate European food law.

Fenech explained that the publicly available information on the hazard profile of the substance indicates that it is a genotoxic carcinogen, for which no safe threshold can be established.

In most cases the levels of ethylene oxide are very low and sometimes not even detectable in the final product but according to the European Union if the level of ethylene oxide in the raw material exceeds the level of 0.1 mg / kg, it should be remembered, she said.

Agricultural chemistry professor Everaldo Attard said Malta timetables that a genotoxic carcinogen damages DNA and turns a normal cell into a cancerous cell.

That doesn’t necessarily mean the cell will cause cancer, he explained, since our bodies are set up to regularly repair DNA defects.

This also does not mean that ingesting a product contaminated with ethylene oxide would put the person in great danger, he added.

“There would be a problem if these products were consumed regularly,” he said.

When asked why Malta has recalled 60 products when other EU member states like France have recalled more than 7,000, Attard said Malta’s market is much smaller and important. a limited range of products.

Matthew Attard, commercial director of Francis Busuttil and Sons, which imports a line of popular ice cream, said the company only had to recall batches of five products due to the contamination, namely the Twix, Bounty and Snickers sixpacks. and Snickers and Twix. ice cream bars.

“Fortunately, the recall involved a limited number of lots of which we had stock that was still in our warehouse and put on hold as soon as we were made aware of the problem.

“This limited the distribution of the affected lots on the market,” he said.

Attard said that while the contaminant levels were low, the recall was being treated seriously in accordance with the law and with the best interests of consumers at heart.

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New Zealand to criminalize planning attacks after mall stabbing https://disc-shelf.com/new-zealand-to-criminalize-planning-attacks-after-mall-stabbing/ https://disc-shelf.com/new-zealand-to-criminalize-planning-attacks-after-mall-stabbing/#respond Sat, 04 Sep 2021 05:23:00 +0000 https://disc-shelf.com/new-zealand-to-criminalize-planning-attacks-after-mall-stabbing/ Police respond at the scene of an attack by a man shot dead by police after injuring several people at a shopping center in Auckland, New Zealand on September 3, 2021. Stuff Limited / Ricky Wilson via REUTERS WELLINGTON, Sept.4 (Reuters) – New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern on Saturday vowed to toughen anti-terrorism laws […]]]>

Police respond at the scene of an attack by a man shot dead by police after injuring several people at a shopping center in Auckland, New Zealand on September 3, 2021. Stuff Limited / Ricky Wilson via REUTERS

WELLINGTON, Sept.4 (Reuters) – New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern on Saturday vowed to toughen anti-terrorism laws this month after an activist with a knife known to authorities stabbed and injured seven people in a supermarket .

Police shot dead the 32-year-old assailant, a Sri Lankan national who had been convicted and jailed for about three years before being released in July, moments after he launched his stabbing wave on Friday.

Ardern said earlier that the man was inspired by the Islamic State militant group and was under constant surveillance, but could no longer be kept in prison by law.

“I pledge that as soon as Parliament resumes, we will complete this work – that means working to pass the law as soon as possible, and no later than the end of this month,” Ardern said at a conference Press.

The Anti-Terrorism Legislation Bill criminalizes planning and preparation that could lead to a terrorist attack, ending what critics have said is a loophole for conspirators to remain free.

But Ardern said it wouldn’t be fair to assume that the stricter law would have made a difference in this case.

“He was a very motivated person who used a visit to the supermarket as a shield for an attack. It’s an incredibly difficult set of circumstances,” she said.

Ardern said the assailant came to the attention of police in 2016 because of his support for a violent ideology inspired by the Islamic State.

Police were following the man as he entered the Countdown supermarket at New Lynn Mall in Auckland. They said they thought he had gone shopping, but he picked up a knife from a rack and started stabbing people.

Police said they shot him within one minute of the attack starting.

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Ardern said the man arrived in New Zealand in 2011 on a student visa and was not known to have had extreme views.

He came to the attention of police in 2016 after expressing sympathy on Facebook for attacks by activists, violent war-related videos and comments advocating violent extremism.

In May 2017, he was arrested at Auckland Airport where authorities believed he was on his way to Syria. He was charged after restricted publications and a hunting knife was discovered at his home but was released on bail.

In August 2018, he bought a knife again and was arrested and jailed. He was released into the community in July this year when surveillance began, Ardern said.

Ardern was briefed on the case at the end of July and again at the end of August and officials, including the police commissioner, have raised the possibility of speeding up the amendment of the anti-terrorism legislation.

Ardern said she wanted to explain why the assailant had not been deported but could not as it would violate the court’s suppression orders, which also prevented her from identifying him, he said. she declared.

But she said she didn’t intend to name him anyway.

“No terrorist, living or dead, deserves his name to be shared for the infamy he sought,” she said.

New Zealand supermarket group Countdown said on Saturday it had removed knives and scissors from its shelves while examining whether it would continue to sell them. Read more

“We want our entire team to feel safe when they come to work,” said Kiri Hannifin, Countdown chief security officer, in a statement.

Other supermarket chains had also removed the sharp knives from their shelves, media reported.

Reporting by Praveen Menon; Editing by William Mallard, Robert Birsel

Our standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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Shelf life – my dream weekend with a bookstore https://disc-shelf.com/shelf-life-my-dream-weekend-with-a-bookstore/ https://disc-shelf.com/shelf-life-my-dream-weekend-with-a-bookstore/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 10:00:25 +0000 https://disc-shelf.com/shelf-life-my-dream-weekend-with-a-bookstore/ I can’t walk past a bookstore without stopping. That can? Sometimes it’s just a glance out the window. Very often it is a complete search for the cavity. I went to good bookstores and bad bookstores, new bookstores and used bookstores, bookstores where I could barely see anything, bookstores where I could definitely smell something. […]]]>

I can’t walk past a bookstore without stopping. That can? Sometimes it’s just a glance out the window. Very often it is a complete search for the cavity.

I went to good bookstores and bad bookstores, new bookstores and used bookstores, bookstores where I could barely see anything, bookstores where I could definitely smell something. I still have the feeling that booksellers have the answer, even when I’m not sure what the question is.

These are the simplest stores: non-perishable goods stacked on shelves or tables. You could do it at home. You probably do. Maybe that’s what makes bookstores welcoming – they look like carefully literate versions of our own living rooms. They almost seem good enough to live there.

Despite all the threat of the internet, there are a few places where bookstores not only survive, but have become the basis of the city’s survival. From the 1960s, Hay-on-Wye in Wales established a reputation as the homeland of books, later becoming the site of an internationally renowned literary festival. Other cities around the world have created something similar: the International Organization of Book Cities now has 19 members, from Norway to New Zealand.

Boules in Wigtown © Julian Germain

A few decades ago, the people of Wigtown in southwest Scotland – reflecting on the closure of the local creamery and distillery and the relocation of the council to Stranraer – wondered if they could follow suit. by Hay. Wigtown defeated at least four other contenders to become Scotland’s national book town.

Book Village could have been more appropriate. Wigtown has around 900 residents. Much of it consists of a single, branching main street, with a bowling green in the middle and a co-op, post office and pub along the edges.

Scotland Map

It has an ATM and eight bookstores. The most established of these, The Bookshop, is widely recognized as Scotland’s largest second-hand bookstore, albeit with the competition. Its owner, Shaun Bythell, wrote the delicious Journal of a bookseller, recounting in a misanthropic way his relationships with customers and Amazon. In 2015, he drawn on a Kindle e-reader with a gun. The carcass is on display in the store, next to a sign that says, “No wholesale discounts.” “

The others each have their own niche: for example, Well-Read Books, the retirement plan of a crime lawyer named Ruth Anderson, Beltie Books specializing in “all things Scottish”, and ReadingLasses in books by and about women.

The open book is perhaps the most unique. A few years ago, a cultured young American who had enjoyed working in a second-hand bookstore in Wigtown had the idea that many other cultured young Americans would like to work in a second-hand bookstore in Wigtown.

Shaun Bythell of The Bookshop with the Kindle he photographed © Julian Germain

The result was a second-hand bookstore, with a one-bedroom apartment above it. The Open Book has become an Airbnb experience, commendable by book lovers around the world. Holidays are defined by the absence, even theoretical, of work. It turns out that many people would instead choose a transition to a touching, unprofitable job that they could only tolerate in small doses.

The open book was reserved almost immediately for years in advance; Airbnb’s calendar system has cracked under the pressure. I found a niche because the pandemic ripped pages out of the newspaper and for much of the past year this little bookstore has been closed.

For a few days, I ran my own bookstore. Did I see myself as Hugh Grant in Notting hill, politely but firmly telling a shoplifter to remove the Cadogan guide to Bali from his pants? Yes I did it. Have I considered selling multiple copies of my own recently published book, How to love animals, to widespread local acclaim? Yes I did it. Deep down I knew I wasn’t stupid enough to try and run a bookstore.

A view over Wigtown in Dumfries and Galloway, South East Scotland © Julian Germain

It turned out that maybe I wasn’t smart enough to try to run a bookstore. My first mistake was buying a train ticket to Wigton, which is not – as I assumed – just the way National Rail spells Wigtown, but a town entirely separate from Cumbria, 50 miles to the east. . Shortly after opening the bookstore on the first day, I knocked over and smashed a glass frame, due to the hand sanitizer.

The apartment is not luxurious, but it is comfortable: a small kitchen, a somewhat austere bedroom and a spacious living-dining room whose wooden windows without curtains overlook the main street. A guestbook contains advice from former occupants, mainly praise for the local community. “Friday is karaoke night at the store. Do it. Do not think about it. “If Renita invites you to dinner, go.” “Lynette makes fantastic cookies.” Social distancing saved me from karaoke.


On the first day, I learned that Wigtown isn’t as distinguished as his Book Town status might suggest. A sandwich panel appeared in the doorway of my shop: “Did you know there’s another nice bookstore just around the corner? Below, an arrow pointed from my shop to well-read books. All is fair in love and War and peace.

The real wisdom of a bookseller is to determine what customers will buy. My first instincts were completely wrong. I placed a few copies of my own book, inviting customers to come and tell me about it. Nothing. I thought a customer was going to mention it, but instead he told me to buy whatever I found by a certain local Wiltshire historian. I do not intend to do so.

A second-hand bookstore offers serendipity. Her books are there because someone died or declutter or lost faith in the power of typed paper, and someone else bothered to save their belongings from the landfill, sort a box and expose them.

A suitably literary statue at the door of La Librairie © Julian Germain

I looked at The Open Book stock. Which would sell? Has everyone who wanted to read Alan Clark’s diaries read them yet? What about the biography of Margaret Thatcher by Charles Moore? It was new and well commented. . . but Thatcher? In Scotland?

“Some used books are there for the long haul. Years, ”assured me Ian Cochrane, co-owner of the Old Bank bookstore in Wigtown. “There is someone for every book.

But were there two clients for the two copies of Michael Parkinson’s autobiography? Would a man really walk in a day, land on the vasectomy guide in our health section, and head over to the counter? Instead, for example, of Google searching for up-to-date medical information? When I came across a book called MySpace Music Marketing in the culture section, I started to worry.

I found a copy of Customer service for dummies, and propped it up next to the cash register. I sat behind a plexiglass screen and prepared myself not to sell anything at all. Finally, a customer bought Pride and Prejudice. Reader, I almost married her.

A customer browses articles at the bookstore © Julian Germain

Safe to say, I misjudged the request. An out of print airplane book, which I thought was unsaleable, turned out to be the perfect gift for someone’s brother. No one bought the John McPhee or Martina Cole stocks, which I assumed were bankers. Defeated, I went upstairs and enjoyed the late evening light and the view of the deserted main street.

On the second day, I moved a table to the center of the store and iced it with books. Surprisingly, a few of them sold out. I put a few Penguin 60s next to the hand sanitizer and was delighted when someone paid £ 2 for a Jan Morris. The comics, which I brought to the front of the store, flew out of the box. A couple rolled their eyes for promoting Clive Cussler’s dozen of trashy thrillers, which they said were only good enough for growing mushrooms. But several other people bought three each.

Ruth Anderson Well Read Books © Julian Germain

Like Hay, Wigtown isn’t that easily accessible: Presumably book-only towns are based on uncompetitive house prices. Customers were mostly day trippers, straying about twenty miles on their way to a quiet town with cheap books and easy parking. A Birmingham man was baffled by the lack of parking meters. I could see what brought them Wigtown – a quiet street, with clean air and a lack of the usual commercialism. You left Amazon’s algorithms behind and entered a world of adorable junk.


I quickly realized my status as an author was not impressive in Wigtown. In San Francisco, everyone seems to be working on a start-up. And in Wigtown, everyone seems to be working on a novel. The town is also home to The Bookshop Band, a folk duo of Beth Porter and Ben Please, who write songs inspired by books. (The exception, “A shop with books inIs a delicious tribute to the booksellers themselves.)

There is also more to the area than books. There are beaches and caves in Whithorn, bird sanctuaries and the Galloway Forest Park. Cream o ‘Galloway is a nearby dairy farm with tours. When the sun rose, I closed the shop and strolled to the boat-free port of Wigtown and out to the sea, where – local history says – two religious dissidents were tied up in the swamps. and drowned by the rising tide.

The open book is currently rescheduling stays disrupted by the pandemic for 2024. By then, some guests will have waited six years. I guess a lot of the brown-page books that I failed to sell will still be there waiting for them.

I wish I had brought some of my used stock from home to thicken the mix. But I still sold more books than expected, around 30 a day. I also developed my idea of ​​a bookseller. Too small, and it becomes unnecessary. Too big, and it looks too much like a normal bookstore – the overwhelming choices, the underwhelming discounts. Ruth Anderson of Well-Read Books said you can make a profit with a bookstore, as long as you don’t factor in the capital costs.

I could have sat in The Open Book longer, drawing in and out of books others had long forgotten. By the time I left I had, of course, received no interest in my own book. The organizers of Wigtown Book Festival kindly invited me to come back this month. Maybe I’ll sell some of my books then. Or maybe not.

Details

Henry Mance was the guest of Airbnb. Stays at The Open Book start at £ 540 for six nights; you can register on a waiting list in case of last minute availability at the Wigtown Book Festival website. This year’s festival runs from September 23 to October 3

Henri mance is the editor-in-chief of the FT’s feature films

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Agriculture: warning shot over labor shortages as shelves empty https://disc-shelf.com/agriculture-warning-shot-over-labor-shortages-as-shelves-empty/ https://disc-shelf.com/agriculture-warning-shot-over-labor-shortages-as-shelves-empty/#respond Sat, 28 Aug 2021 06:02:24 +0000 https://disc-shelf.com/agriculture-warning-shot-over-labor-shortages-as-shelves-empty/ Broccoli shipments have been hit The warning of severe labor shortages hitting the Scottish food and drink industry in the run-up to the Christmas rush, in an open letter to the Scottish and UK governments, called for urgent action. The letter was hosted by the Food and Drink Federation and highlighted that the impact of […]]]>
Broccoli shipments have been hit
Broccoli shipments have been hit

The warning of severe labor shortages hitting the Scottish food and drink industry in the run-up to the Christmas rush, in an open letter to the Scottish and UK governments, called for urgent action. The letter was hosted by the Food and Drink Federation and highlighted that the impact of the crisis at the local level was increasing, with meat processors and transport companies all affected alongside the farm labor force needed to harvest and process a wide variety of crops.

Andrew Faichney, Managing Director of East Of Scotland Growers (ESG) yesterday highlighted the costly impact Scottish growers are facing due to labor, transport, processing availability and weather conditions.

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The chain of problems saw the Cupar-based agricultural cooperative placed in a position where it was unable to market four million heads of broccoli and cauliflower – with more chances of reaching the market. walked this week.

The industry letter stated that Brexit and the Covid pandemic had accelerated existing pressures on labor availability: “We have now reached a crisis point putting the growth, viability and security of many Scottish businesses at risk, with negative impacts for consumers. We must act now to save Christmas.

The letter called on the UK government to: – Introduce a 12-month Covid recovery visa for the food and beverage supply chain to address immediate pressures on the industry and allow employers to expand recruitment to EU workers and other foreign workers;

– Request an urgent review by the Advisory Committee on Migration of the needs of the food and drink sector;

– Eliminate work visa fees for the food and beverage supply chain until 2022.

The group also advised the Scottish Government to: – Ensure that support for automation is integrated into Scottish Government funding programs where it supports productivity and the development of better jobs; – Collaborate with the Scotland Food & Drink Partnership to continue to promote the industry as a great career destination and to provide opportunities through apprenticeships and other programs.

“These are unprecedented and turbulent times and, until stability returns for business, we call on the UK and Scottish governments to support the industry and implement these measures. Without it, we are confident that the current disruption in the supply chain will only worsen as we enter the peak trading period heading into Christmas, ”the signatories warned.

A similar letter was supported by the English NFU south of the border, where the UK-wide labor shortage has been estimated at 500,000.

Vice President Tom Bradshow said it was simplistic to say that the end of the holiday would see more people looking for work – pointing out that the majority of those workers were concentrated in urban areas and not where they were the majority of agrifood roles.


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